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Carnegie Papers

© 2008 Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. All rights reserved.

  
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Carnegie Papers
Carnegie Papers present new research by Endowment associates and their collaborators
from other institutions. The series includes new time-sensitive research and key excerpts
from larger works in progress. Comments from readers are most welcome; please reply to
the author at the address above or by e-mail to pubs@CarnegieEndowment.org.


About the Author
Valery Tishkov has served as director of the Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology,
Russian Academy of Sciences, since 1989. He is also director of the IEA Center for the
Study and Management of Conflicts, and serves as chairman of the Commission on Tolerance
and Freedom of Conscience of the Public Chamber of the Russian Federation. He is
a prolific writer, having published more than twenty books, including two encyclopedias on
Russian ethnicity. He is a member of the Public Chamber of Russia and the Global Commission
on International Migration.


Contents


Foreword
1
  
Introduction 3
 
The Russian World as Humanitarian
Challenge and Political Project
4
 
Factors and Dynamics of the “Russian World” 10
 
The Old Russian World 15
 
Traditional Diaspora and Difficult Circumstances 18
 
Diaspora, Identity, and Ethnic Agglomerations 19
 
The Far Russian World of Today 21
 
Post-Soviet Diasporas in the Russian World 23
 
Russian Language and the Russian-Speaking
Population of the CIS and Baltic States
26
 
Return of the Russian Language 35
 
Crises of the New Russian World 37
 
Estonia and Latvia 37
 
Ukraine 40
 
Uzbekistan 42
 
Conclusion 46
 
Notes 49